Non-Profit Administrators Are Heading to the For-Profit Sector

Non-Profit Administrators Are Heading to the For-Profit Sector

Amidst recent controversy over recruiting practices and poor job placement, for-profit education institutions have begun to recruit non-profit administrators in an effort to influence what can be a predatory, misleading admissions culture. The intent is to demonstrate to Washington and critics in general that there are many positive similarities between for- and non-profit schools, and that for-profits offer accessibility and opportunity to students who may be unable to enter a traditional non-profit.

Diane Auer Jones, an assistant secretary for postsecondary education during the George W. Bush presidency and a lobbyist and Congressional staffer, is one of the first to make the move. Jones recently accepted a position as Career Education Corp.’s vice president of external and regulatory affairs.

Long before her career began in education, Jones was a massage therapist student at a for-profit college in Baltimore. Her son, similarly, attended a for-profit college. Jones has remarked that she would never work for a “bad actor” and that the for-profit sector, despite criticism, is “not all bad.” Her reputation and work will be a huge asset to the company, but Jones was quick to warn that for-profits have proven themselves and can stand on their own. “If by hiring me it does help some people open their eyes that the sector is serious about doing it the right way, then great. If people look at my credibility and that lets them look at the sector in a new way, then that’s a benefit for the company.”

Geri H. Malandra, a former official at the University of Texas System and the American Council on Education, has followed Jones’ lead and switched sectors. Malandra recently accepted the provost position at Kaplan University and brings to the table extensive experience in the education sector. Malandra has said that she has followed and been interested in for-profit education institutions since the 1990s. During the 90s, Malandra headed a continuing education project at the University of Minnesota- Twin Cities which operated as a for-profit. Her experience, she says, “helped me come to see that for-profits are just as passionate about the quality of education, just as passionate about student outcomes, just as passionate about serving our nation” as the best nonprofit colleges.

Jones and Malandra are just two non-profit administrators that have chosen to move to for-profit education. And it’s not just the pay. Larry A. Isaak, the former president of the Midwestern Higher Education Compact, recently made the move to Capella University, assuming the university’s presidency. Isaak recently noted that his decision wasn’t based on for or non-profit. He was driven, he says by “the university’s focus on adult learners, innovations in delivery and offering a student-centric approach.”

Although for-profit education institutions have established an admirable traditional and reputation (despite some recent criticism) all their own, the decisions made by some of non-profit’s best to switch sectors speaks volumes.…

Read More
Recent Polls Show Four Year Colleges Are Not for Everyone

Recent Polls Show Four Year Colleges Are Not for Everyone

A college degree is central to most people’s conception of the “American Dream,” but the dearth of good jobs resulting from the economic downturn has people re-evaluating exactly what a college degree looks like.

The Associated Press and Stanford University teamed up to poll over 1,000 adults nationwide; the poll measured their opinions of educational quality in four-year colleges and universities versus community colleges and technical schools.

The vast majority of those polled, nearly 70%, said that many community colleges offer an education as good as one from a four-year school. The majority of respondents also noted that it’s “sometimes better for students to pursue a diploma or certificate from a two-year school than aim to enter a four-year college.”

Larry Wyse, one of the adults interviewed for the survey, said that the traditional mindset that “every student should attend a four-year college,” is frustrating. Wyse, who holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics, chose instead to pursue a technical trade and has run a heating repair and plumping business for almost 30 years.

Says Wyse, “not every student who graduates from high school has the capability or the financial means or the intestinal fortitude that it takes to complete a four-year degree. There are a lot of skilled trade and technical service type jobs that are begging for applicants.”

The results of the AP and Stanford poll appear to reiterate this sentiment as more Americans are choosing community colleges, trade schools, or online universities to earn a certificate or degree in a specialized field of study or trade.

When asked if college degrees prepare students for the workforce, 62% of respondents answered “yes” for community colleges while 68% responded affirmatively on behalf of four-year schools.

The close proximity of these figures is telling and supports the rise in popularity, prominence and educational equality of community colleges, trade schools, and online universities versus their four-year, traditional counterparts.…

Read More
Special Education Does Not Mean Not Learning

Special Education Does Not Mean Not Learning

Most learning disabled students enter special education, because they are not learning at the same pace as their peers. To be eligible for special services, students take many special tests determined at a preeligibility meeting. The students’ scores must be statistically significant for him/her to be eligible.

Many administrators, psychologists, teachers and “experts” believe that special education students make little, if any, progress from year to year. The unchanging nature of those students is the logic behind administering eligibility (excluding academic) testing every 6 years instead of every 3 years. That is the primary reason given, but another reason is money. Since psychologists or teachers on special assignment (TOSA) are expensive, there is motivation to reduce the demand for their time. Realistically, there is usually no need to continually waste instructional time by having students miss classes to take repetitive tests that essentially mean nothing except determine eligibility.

The academic evaluation tests are what determine whether or not the student is making progress. Usually, professionals are “happy” to see the student make 1-6 months gain over a year. They are happy to see those types of gains because they are typical for learning disabilities students. Unfortunately, most learning disabled students do make those types of gains, with a typical ceiling of progress between 3rd and 4th grade levels of performance.

Having a learning disability does not mean the child can’t or won’t learn. It means that the child learns differently and/or at a different pace from others. Many students’ problems can disappear with specific, direct instruction. This does not mean reading from a script for instructional purposes in a scientifically researched program. It does mean finding ways to teach both the strengths and the weaknesses of the child.

Rarely do educators, either special or general, sufficiently understand learning and developmental theories and practices to impact deviant learners’ instruction. General education teachers are required to teach out of prescribed texts and at a pace allowing them to cover all the content required for that grade/class level. Even more rarely do special education teachers understand the difference between a cognitive delay and an inability to learn content presented in any way.

The shame in education is that assigning a student the label of special education (whatever designation) usually condemns that student to lower expectations (parental and teachers’) and poor quality and pacing of instruction. Students learn to believe those lower expectations, giving excuses that they can’t or are disabled or unable to learn, and perform accordingly. It becomes a self-perpetuating cycle that need not happen.

Poor performances by learning disabled students should not be acceptable to the student, the parents or the teachers. Yes, they will have difficulties learning to read or do math, but that doesn’t mean they can’t or won’t. It does mean it might take them a little longer. It does mean they might need some special interventions or strategies. It does not mean giving up and accepting what has always been because it has always been …

Read More
Is Enough Done For Education in Rural Areas?

Is Enough Done For Education in Rural Areas?

The rural refer to the region of a country where the dwellers have limited or no access to basic amenities, utilities such as electricity, proper sanitation and water supplies. In addition to that, rural citizens also have limited education and learning opportunity. Consequently, it has created an educational gap in between the rural and the develop city which is unhealthy for a countries unified and integrated education system. Therefore, it is crucial for the government of the country to start to pay attention to the rural education level and implement various steps and policies immediately.

First of all, more experienced and well-trained teachers should be available for the rural areas. Various acts and regulations should be introduced to ensure a teacher to serve in a rural school or rural areas for a period of time before undergo they further their teaching career in the cities. Besides that, all the teachers should be well equipped with the certain special skills such as proficiency in native language, excellent adaptation towards culture conflict and differences in order for the teacher to be able to blend effectively with the rural students.

Besides that, various educational and basic facilities should be made available for the students. For examples, more rural public schools with sufficient and clean classrooms should be constructed in order to provide a conducive learning environment. Other than that, a good school is also able to provide the teachers a better working environment which could also helps to allured more well trained teachers to be willing to serve in the rural areas for a longer term. In addition to that, information technology should also be introduced into rural areas as the accessibility toward information is very essential in education. For instance, increase in the accessibility of TV sets in African family has successfully reduces illiteracy, promote writing and simple arithmetic.

Furthermore, the rural students should not be disdained or alienated in every aspect. Rural students should be given equal and fair opportunity in accessibility of learning materials, social welfare and tertiary education rather being the victim of the double standard applied in certain educational institutes especially in the country such as India, China and Africa whereby human rights is greatly damaged by the social and economic gap in the hierarchy of the society. Therefore, it is very common to see only the riches or groups of higher social status are enrolled in the local institute of learning in those countries.

In conclusion, the work of developing and improving the education level of the rural should not be neglected anymore. Other than humanity purpose, the effort to develop the rural education will also helps the country to discover new talents and human assets that are able to bring tremendous contribution to the countries’ social structure, politics and economics.…

Read More
Features And Advantages Of Mobile Learning

Features And Advantages Of Mobile Learning

Learning is a progressive work that never ends at any stage. There are many new things that are being created daily with the advancements in the field of Information and Technology, Rocket Science and Research and Development. Thus there is no limit for the learning process.

Initially the learning process was experienced only at the schools and colleges. Later on with the advent of the internet there was the possibility for any person to refer any kind of data by sitting at home. And now with the advent of the latest technologically advanced mobile phones one can say that the phenomenon of m learning is really an exciting one. There is the possibility for the immediate access of data anytime and anywhere just with the presence of the mobile. Here we can have the discussion about the evolution of the process of mlearning.

The workshop which took place in Birmingham in the year 2002 would not have thought that the content of that workshop would have transformed that much. Yes, the first learning workshop as held there only. There have been several of these kinds that have been happening in the recent past. The latest one was the 6th workshop that was held at Melbourne in Australia. There has been the tremendous growth that has been experienced in the field of mlearning since 2002.

It is a simple concept that can be developed into all the latest technologically advanced mobiles. There is the linking with the internet that makes the mobile as a learning tool. One can also say that in mobile learning, the mobile is only used as a tool to project the information. Since mobile is a common device that is available among all it has become a huge hit. The internet serves as a perfect base for this learning.

There are several advantages when it comes to mobile learning. The instant availability of data is the main advantage and hence preferred by many. Also the latest possible data is plucked on from the web and provided which makes it more reliable. There were several themes that were followed in each of the mobile learning workshops. Some among them are “Significant potential availability”, “New Possibilities”, “Learning in your hands”. With these themes in mind the development of mobile learning has happened in the past. Hence we can expect more and more advancements in the coming years.…

Read More